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Quentin Miller Responds to Speculation He Was Ghostwriter on Nas’ ‘King’s Disease II’

After a viral clip fueled rumors that Quentin Miller “ghostwrote” for Nas, the prolific songwriter has hit back against critics.

Miller is credited as a writer on Nas’ King’s Disease II song “The Pressure,” and in a video the Atlanta native broke down how he isn’t a ghostwriter despite the label following him ever since it was revealed he wrote uncredited lyrics for Drake in 2015. 

“OK, so apparently this whole Quentin-worked-with-Nas conversation is going a little more viral than what I thought ’cause now people are reaching out to me and asking me to clear it up,” he said in a clip posted to Instagram, as seen below. “Off the strength, I want to shout out to Hit-Boy for the opportunity that he gave me when he invited me to the studio and allowed me to work with Nas.”

Miller has worked with Hit-Boy for many years, and he said the producer credited him on the Nas song after he pulled up to the studio and threw “some ideas out.” He added, “I just bounced some ideas, a couple ideas win. That’s it. That’s all that happened with the Nas shit.”

Source/complex/WaneEnt

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